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The OG on 1 Peter

in summary of one book of the New Testament. Today it’s the OG

(Old Guy—that’s me) on the Book of 1 Peter.

1 Peter was the second book of the Bible that I memorized (James was the first). 

I’ve meditated on this book for decades. One verse motivated me to spend the next 40 years memorizing a chapter or two of the Bible each year. . . 

For you have been born again not of seed which is perishable, but imperishable, that is, through the living and enduring word of God (1 Peter 1:23, NASB1995).

It’s one of the last books of the New Testament and focuses on polytheistic Gentile believers. So, Peter teaches them about the God of the Bible. We can see hints of the great Christian doctrine of the Trinity in the second verse of the book. . .  

According to the foreknowledge of God the Father, by the sanctifying work of the Spirit, to obey Jesus Christ and be sprinkled with His blood: May grace and peace be multiplied to you (1:2).

The background of this book is persecution. In 64 AD, the Roman Emperor Nero set fire to a slum hoping to burn it down, making room for his palace to be enlarged, but gusts of wind whipped up a firestorm, and seventy-five percent of the city was destroyed.

Nero needed someone to blame, so he instigated a great persecution against Christians, and some were literally dipped into pitch and burned on poles to light the Circus Maximus at night, where many refugees encamped.

Now we understand this verse. . . 

Beloved, do not be surprised at the fiery ordeal among you, which comes upon you for your testing, as though something strange were happening to you; but to the degree that you share the sufferings of Christ, keep on rejoicing, so that at the revelation of His glory you may also rejoice [and be overjoyed] (4:12-13).

1 Peter, besides teaching on how to endure persecution, also instructs about two reactions of Christians (especially lukewarm believers) to difficult times.. 

First: We compromise with the world and make accommodations for the flesh.

As obedient children, do not be conformed to the former lusts which were yours in your ignorance, but like the Holy One who called you, be holy yourselves also in all your behavior (1:14-15).

Second: We complain against one another. 

To sum up, all of you be harmonious, sympathetic, loving, compassionate, and humble, not returning evil for evil or insult for insult, but giving a blessing instead; for you were called for this very purpose that you would inherit a blessing (3:9-10).

Above all, keep fervent in your love for one another, because love covers a multitude of sins (4:8).

1 Peter teaches us to worship the true God, endure difficult times through faithfulness, and love one another, and it ends with a verse very relevant today. . . 

[Be sober-minded; be watchful.] Your adversary the devil prowls around like a roaring lion, seeking someone to devour (5:8).

We are in a battle, but victory is assured. Peter reminds us that, “After we have suffered for a while, the God of grace, will perfect, confirm, strengthen, and establish you” (5:9).

Peace to all of us who are in Christ.

On Monday, for the next few months I will write an Interruption 

in summary of one book of the New Testament. Today it’s the OG

(Old Guy—that’s me) on the Book of 1 Peter.

1 Peter was the second book of the Bible that I memorized (James was the first). 

I’ve meditated on this book for decades. One verse motivated me to spend the next 40 years memorizing a chapter or two of the Bible each year. . . 

For you have been born again not of seed which is perishable, but imperishable, that is, through the living and enduring word of God (1 Peter 1:23, NASB1995).

It’s one of the last books of the New Testament and focuses on polytheistic Gentile believers. So, Peter teaches them about the God of the Bible. We can see hints of the great Christian doctrine of the Trinity in the second verse of the book. . .  

According to the foreknowledge of God the Father, by the sanctifying work of the Spirit, to obey Jesus Christ and be sprinkled with His blood: May grace and peace be multiplied to you (1:2).

The background of this book is persecution. In 64 AD, the Roman Emperor Nero set fire to a slum hoping to burn it down, making room for his palace to be enlarged, but gusts of wind whipped up a firestorm, and seventy-five percent of the city was destroyed.

Nero needed someone to blame, so he instigated a great persecution against Christians, and some were literally dipped into pitch and burned on poles to light the Circus Maximus at night, where many refugees encamped.

Now we understand this verse. . . 

Beloved, do not be surprised at the fiery ordeal among you, which comes upon you for your testing, as though something strange were happening to you; but to the degree that you share the sufferings of Christ, keep on rejoicing, so that at the revelation of His glory you may also rejoice [and be overjoyed] (4:12-13).

1 Peter, besides teaching on how to endure persecution, also instructs about two reactions of Christians (especially lukewarm believers) to difficult times.. 

First: We compromise with the world and make accommodations for the flesh.

As obedient children, do not be conformed to the former lusts which were yours in your ignorance, but like the Holy One who called you, be holy yourselves also in all your behavior (1:14-15).

Second: We complain against one another. 

To sum up, all of you be harmonious, sympathetic, loving, compassionate, and humble, not returning evil for evil or insult for insult, but giving a blessing instead; for you were called for this very purpose that you would inherit a blessing (3:9-10).

Above all, keep fervent in your love for one another, because love covers a multitude of sins (4:8).

1 Peter teaches us to worship the true God, endure difficult times through faithfulness, and love one another, and it ends with a verse very relevant today. . . 

[Be sober-minded; be watchful.] Your adversary the devil prowls around like a roaring lion, seeking someone to devour (5:8).

We are in a battle, but victory is assured. Peter reminds us that, “After we have suffered for a while, the God of grace, will perfect, confirm, strengthen, and establish you” (5:9).

Peace to all of us who are in Christ.

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