Even when we were dead and doomed in our many sins, he united us into the very life of Christ and saved us by his wonderful grace!  Ephesians 2:10

Deep grace!

Grace means “gift” or “blessing.” In the middle of a discussion, did you stop grace and start to argue, defend, or accuse? Afterward, did you feel drained, almost dirty?

Your grace was not deep enough.

Living in grace means that those we encounter should leave with a gift. From our reserve of grace to their need. Our thankfulness to their ungratefulness. Our gentleness to their anger. Our calm deliberation to their unreasonableness.

The best gift – the best grace – is given when it isn’t deserved.

That is how we received our salvation – forgiveness from God. I’ve noticed that those at the bottom of their despair when finding grace, often have more grace for others, while those who have led a decent life haven’t experienced deep grace.

Do you have grace so deep that another person can’t empty your soul of it?

Living in deep grace means forsaking the idea of you being good. If you have belief in Jesus without experiencing deep forgiveness, your faith will become a mishmash of pride that infects otherwise great theology, and even patriotism, with judgment and hypocrisy.

The mark of a mature Christian is the ability to receive deep grace and then give it in abundance to others.

The grace of the American church isn’t deep now.

It is why we disagree so much. Deep grace carries an inhibition against judging others. Those who cried for release from pain can sympathize with those in pain. Those finding freedom of thought can sympathize with the close-minded.

Grace doesn’t accommodate sin, but it causes mercy toward the sin of others. Why else would Jesus die?

Deep grace comes from repentance. Both the desperate and lifetime churchgoers can be humbled by the blood of Jesus – that moment when self-righteousness becomes nothing but filthy rags.

Grace will go as deep as your confession. Often our trials are gateways to this grace.

In the end nothing but grace matters.