I’ve always considered Psalm 1 to be a pre-eminent Psalm. It is the first Psalm, and the content is the Word of God. You can’t get a better Psalm.

Psalm 2 has always been like a second child. Yes, in the same family but the second, not the first or the baby of the family. As the second child must try harder, so must Psalm 2.

And Psalm 2 succeeds:

Ask of me, and I will make the nations your heritage, and the ends of the earth your possession.  Psalm 2:8 ESV

While Psalm 1 isn’t mentioned in the New Testament at all, Psalm 2 is quoted 17 times. “Take that, Psalm 1,” says younger Psalm 2.

As you read Psalm 2 you will quickly note the prophecies about Jesus:

The kings of the earth set themselves and take counsel together against the Lord’s Anointed (v. 2).

The Lord said to me, “You are my Son; today I have begotten you. Ask of me, and I will make the nations your heritage, and the ends of the earth your possession (vv. 7-8).

Whereas Psalm 1 discusses the blessings of those who keep the law of the Lord, Psalm 2 discusses the fate of those who willingly break the law of the Lord:

Why do the nations rage and the peoples plot in vain (v. 1)?

He who sits in the heavens laughs; the Lord holds them in derision. Then he will speak to them in his wrath and terrify them in his fury (vv. 4-5).

When I read prophecy about Jesus, His life, how He was treated, and the cultural/political context of the first century, I consider the parallels to His church in the last days.

We are in the last days and the nations are raging against the laws of God and Jesus.

Let’s go back to verse 8 when God says to Jesus, “I will make the nations your heritage, and the ends of the earth your blessing.” Jesus says to us, “All authority has been given to me, therefore go into the entire world and make disciples, and my presence will be with you” (Matthew 28:18-19).

Parallel blessings – indicating our calling and privilege today – as we can take the Gospel to the nations in ways not possible a few years ago. A few days ago I taught a conference to pastors in India about the Great Commission. In our LampPost strategy, we will be training disciples like you, to disciple Christians in other nations (visit www.disciplinganother.com for more information).

The nations are ours.

Psalm 1 begins with a blessing, while Psalm 2 ends with a blessing.

Blessed are all who take refuge in him (v. 12).

This is your answer for the difficulties that you face – take refuge in Jesus.

I’m very proud of the second sibling Psalm 2 – aren’t you?